PPI Group – Imperial/Cancer Research – Meeting

A fascinating meeting this evening of the Patient and Public Involvement Group from Imperial College and Cancer Research.

We meet regularly however often we discuss aspects that I’m unable to share with you so I don’t post a blog entry about every meeting.  However some of the tweets/facebook posts about upcoming events or opinion may be posted from Living Beyond Diagnosis accounts.

Tonight’s meeting was slightly different to our usual discussions.  In that many of the agenda items related to artistic and creative projects that it is hoped will support, aid and influence both patients and the public.

I am unable to go into the finer detail but wanted to share a little about the items and ask for your feedback.

Artwork in hospitals and cancer clinics.  An artist has been commissioned to produce some artwork for display in a very busy hospital cancer clinic.  Tonight he was able to share with us a few of his ideas of what he would like to produce and also to hear our feedback and comments on the proposed work.  His medium is ceramics and his aim is for the artwork to be uplifting for patients, intriguing and engaging for those who may visit the clinic often and perhaps to also be further dimensional to include some more medical references and in particular research and cells.

No mean feat ahead of this chap.

What a wonderful project… for him to create and of course for others to enjoy.

The discussions this evening were varied.  Some were very much for it being engaging and uplifting.  Some felt that if it had medical references to research and cells it may be too much in this clinic but others thought it may bring about discussion and hope.  We discussed where it should be placed.. or perhaps could it transcend both the reception desk and surrounding walls?  Perhaps to include some clever lighting?  There are many considerations and much planning to also ensure that no matter where you sit or walk within the clinic you can enjoy the artwork.

What would be your considerations?

Video Project.  We were presented with a video project that has been taking place over the past 6 months.  Video cameras were given to 9 women who had been diagnosed with breast cancer (some with secondary breast cancer).  Each women was asked simply to record whatever they liked.  Some did a ‘talking heads’ approach of short interviews to camera; others were determined to show their families and life living WITH cancer; most of them showed bad times as well as the good; living with side effects; what the treatment and drug regime was like; and so much more.

The videos have been sensitively edited (with each of the women involved) and the task of how best to use the honest and open footage to educate the public and also support and inform others diagnosed.

The aim is that it will become part of an art installation where each video is played continuously on 9 walls of a gallery.  Thereby giving the ‘viewer’ the opportunity to watch all or part of each journey.

It is also hoped to edit the footage (approximately 2hrs for each lady) down to a documentary length and to be able to get it onto the TV.

We also discussed the possibility of some of it being used for the training of people working with cancer patients.  Medical professionals but also HR/employers.  Perhaps in a similar way to the GP Training film that I was involved in that is now part of the London Deanery GP training.

Where else do you think this could be used?

I suggested that in addition to the current footage perhaps another video project might be looking at the 360* surrounding the diagnosed.  For example taking a point in time of the diagnosis (perhaps being told of cancer, the start of treatment, surgery dates etc) and asking the diagnosed to tell what that moment was like as well as their colleague, husband/wife, child, parent, neighbour, friend etc etc.  To demonstrate that cancer affects much more than the individual and allowing others to understand.

Portrait Project.  A fascinating project created and considered by a lady herself diagnosed with secondary breast cancer and recently told that she is now in palliative stages.  Her background is in visual media and she would like to share her journey through photographs.  HOWEVER not of herself but highlighting the wonderful team of medical professionals that have been part of her journey, have been keeping her alive and indeed for whom she is truly grateful.  She would like to say thank you and for others to know that a cancer patient’s journey is filled with teams of professionals who work together for the best outcome.

She has put together a team of photographers, videographers, editors and other talented people who will be responsible for capturing each and everyone who’s been involved in ‘keeping her alive’.  From the nurses, breast consultant, sarcoma consultant, oncologist, heart specialist, plastic surgeon, wig fitter, receptionist, cleaner, anesthetist etc etc.  They are asked (and with her guidance) that each portrait will show the person behind the white coat as well as acknowledge the work they have done.

It is aimed that this portrait project will be finished and on display in SW London in September of this year.

Tissue Collection.  At this point, I can’t tell you everything about this agenda item.  However I would like your opinion please.

A great deal of cancer research is carried out on tissue samples taken from patients via a biopsy or surgical excision.  Sadly not everyone knows how to donate tissue to research projects and, historically, consultants are concerned about having discussions about research with patients so this may be overlooked.

My question to you is at what point and with whom do you think you should have a discussion about tissue collection for research purposes?  Was it discussed with you?  How did you feel about it?

Are you aware that cancer cells change during a cancer ‘journey’ and particularly if it spreads to other parts of the body.  There is therefore huge value in tissue samples being examined from each part of the body affected and indeed researchers feel that this information will help guide to the best outcome for individual treatment.

Another taboo that needs to also be overcome (in my opinion) is that of tissue donation after death.  Researchers again have huge value in looking at the tissue of a deceased patient.  If they are able to compare the tissue with that taken from a primary tumour and again any secondary tumours, they believe this may also aid them in understanding cancer development and further treatments.

Would you give your specific consent to tissue sample being taken after you death?  When and how do you think it should be discussed?

Breast Cancer Lecture Series.  There next in the series – “The Secondary Breast Clinical Nurse Specialist: her role in breast cancer patient care.  6-7pm 15th July at Maggie’s Centre, Charing Cross Hospital.

These lectures are in an informal setting and after the talk you are invited, and encouraged, to ask questions of the speaker.  Please do pass on the invitation to others.  If you’re interested in attending please email Kelly Gleason k.gleason@imperial.ac.uk as places are limited to approximately 20 people.

I’d love to hear from you about any of the points above.

One thought on “PPI Group – Imperial/Cancer Research – Meeting

  1. Hi Anna, I am looking forward to seeing you sometime. How are you doing at the moment?your energy levels seem good. My main weakness is struggling to read (apart from deep fear and panic). Loads of positive support are making me feel spoilt prior to 6 weeks in London from last day of this month. I will be sent home at weekends. I had been hoping to spend loads of time with Jenny and her family too so timing is really frustrating but I gather some people keep going well and my love of London will help. No real coherence here but loads of love Susie xxx

    Sent from my iPhone

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